• Home
  • /Blog
  • /Powerlessness: Where’s the 2nd chance in that mess?

Warning: Illegal string offset 'width' in /home/hollyel9/public_html/wp-content/themes/ePix/lib/inc/classes/blog-class.php on line 231

Warning: Illegal string offset 'crop' in /home/hollyel9/public_html/wp-content/themes/ePix/lib/inc/classes/blog-class.php on line 241

Powerlessness: Where’s the 2nd chance in that mess?

Read the full blog

Excerpt from blog

“The only devils in the world are those running in our own hearts. That is where the battle should be fought.”
–Mahatma Gandhi

2nd chances can show up in disguise, unannounced, and hard to take at first. I didn’t know when I listened years ago to this early childhood director from New Jersey that her words would change my life:

“Feeling guilty about what happened is easier than feeling powerless,” she told me. “It’s a lot easier to blame myself and beat myself up than it is to admit there was nothing I could have done to make things better. Look,” she continued, “having no control is too scary for most of us; it’s painful to stand by and witness suffering and not be able to do a thing to stop it.”

Her words darted straight into my heart.

When my son became addicted to nicotine, I couldn’t bear to see him shaking and agitated until he could light up his next cigarette. I winced internally when I watched him get his nicotine fix. My brain contorted with concern: What can I do to help him stop? How can I hold up the mirror so he can see he’s hurting himself?

As a mom, I felt guilty that I couldn’t help my son stay healthy. I couldn’t bear feeling powerless, unable to stop him from hurting himself.

And there it is: Guilt is easier to live with than powerlessness. Powerlessness means admitting I cannot change my son’s mind for him. God, grant me the serenity to accept that I can’t change anyone else, especially people I love. My son is an adult. Smoking is his choice.

Listen: Changing myself is hard enough. Trust me! I have more maturity gaps than a centipede has legs.

I’m an addict too, not to substances but to processes. Most of my life I have been a work addict. Working hard, working long hours, doing more than is required, aiming toward perfection; all of these seemed to help my career advance. So I kept doing them.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*